Log to Lumber Huge Pine sawn into Trailer Deck Planks on 1800s Steam Powered Sawmill

Here”s another “Log to Lumber” video I shot this year (2014) sawing a large 34 inch Pine log into 10/4 or 2 1/2 inch planks for trailer decking. I would have shot more of the 1st few cuts getting it squared up but ended up hitting some fence wire that knocked out a bunch of the teeth and required sawing 3 feet off the end of the log, sharpening what teeth I could and changing the rest before getting up and running again. After all that, I didn”t get back to filming as quickly as I planned to, but still was able to piece together a longer 7 plus minute video showing most of the process of turning a good sized log into heavy planks. Starting out with a couple slabs to get the log squared up, then sawing several 2 1/2 inch or 10/4 (ten-quarter) slabs that I later edged and ripped into smaller planks for trailer deck planks. After getting the “cant” or squared up log sawn down to 8 inches thick and dropping it down flat, I then ripped a series of 10/4 by 8″s off of that before edging and ripping the wider ones down to size. This was shot on August 3rd 2014 at the Stephenson County Antique Engine Club”s 45th Annual Old Time Threshing Show and Antique Display aka The Freeport Show. The Sawmill is an 1880″s or 1890″s Vintage Gaar Scott (or most of it is anyway, there are parts of other brands of mills on it as well) The Steam Engine is a Port Huron which has been on display here for most of the 45 years we have had the show. It”s a lot of hard work, but as they say in circus, “The Show Must Go On” and you do what needs to be done regardless of aches and pains. Having a long history of back problems, I”m just glad I had some Vicodin to ease the pain some along with getting myself in the right “mind-set” to perform as needed. It also helps to have things to lean on when needed. What isn”t ever shown is my barely being able to walk each night after the show and/or moving slowly the next morning before the crowds show up to watch. A little oil and a lot of leverage, also makes things easier than what they appear to be.

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